Written by Jabir MacMillian

 

When you’re looking for mainstream artists who have been the frontmen of the recent melodic rap movement, Drake and Big Sean are among some of those faces. Both take direct inspiration from Kanye in various ways, and have both held massive beefs with rap great Kendrick Lamar. They’re frequent collaborators. Their most recent projects were both extremely hyped up, and didn’t live up to its billing. Due to the similarities between both, these two dudes are worth comparing, let’s get it into it.

FLOW

Comparing both’s singular verses, which both open up the track, this is no offense to Drake. I think his flow fit the beat and mood perfectly. But there just isn’t anything extremely impressive. He doesn’t even have the best verse on his track. Big Sean SNAPPED here. This is some almost “1st Quarter Freestyle” level flowing here. Drake’s just out his league here.

Sean: 9.5/10 Drake: 6.5/10

 

LYRICS

This is a subject where neither really reinvent the wheel. Sean, usually one of the kings of punchlines, really gets to the point in the straightest path possible. In highlighting his emotion and flow, the lyrics lack here. However, I would say Aubrey came with some of his most interesting (on face value) bars on the entire More Life. Quips like “40 got house on the lake, I ain’t know we had a lake/she complainin’ how I’m late, I ain’t know it was a date” and “I got her waitin’ at my place, I got no baby on the way/I’m talkin’ Baby like Stunna, I’m talkin’ Baby like Face” could at least make Big Quint nod his head real quick. Who’s the lesser evil here?

Sean: 5/10 Drake: 6/10

 

SUBJECT MATTER

Trust me, they don’t handle this one topic much differently. The only form of differing “interpretations” would be Aubrey’s side chooses to big up the life post-sacrifices, while Sean and crew reference what it took to get them to this point. It’s pretty much how you want your food presented in determining what tastes better.

Sean: 5.5/10 Drake: 4.5/10

 

PRODUCTION

More Life features many Reggae/Dancehall/British hip hop “fragments” in the grand puzzle of instrumentation, and this song isn’t much different. His version has quite the tone and feeling to it, I love the beat, don’t get me wrong, but you kinda hear something like this often in Drake’s discog. That all being said, it’s better than Big Sean’s version. Simple drums, repeated hats, same keys, Big Sean’s beat seems painfully simple. It makes it very open for the flows and emotion to be highlighted, but it doesn’t really grab the listeners’ ear.
Sean: 4/10 Drake: 7/10

CONCLUSION

You might’ve been able to infer this by now, but I really do feel like Drake came with the more listenable track here. Sean tries to go for a more grand, meaningful attempt at a song here, which I appreciate and respect. I think it just falls a bit short. Drake knows what he’s making and it works out well for all parties involved. I also think his collaborators were more standout; I prefer 2Chainz and Thug over the Migos here. So I’ll put it like this. If you’re looking for a track that fits within the album, Sean does that well. If you’re looking for purely a better listen, Drake does that better here.

Drake’s Sacrifices is the winner here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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